Freedom Project

FREEDOM PROJECT is a multimedia physical theater piece that interweaves gripping personal stories, evocative imagery, and athletic choreography in an examination of mass incarceration in America. With material drawn from extensive research, as well as personal experience, the Everett Company call upon our common humanity to challenge the conditions that have transformed the “land of the free” into the most incarcerating country in the world.

AT EVERETT STAGE:

March 20-22, 27-29, April 3-4, 10-12

$25 – Fridays & Saturdays at 8pm and Sundays at 2pm – 9 Duncan Avenue, Providence, RI 

(First two Sundays are pay what you can.)

Call 401-831-9479 to reserve tickets.

About Everett Company: Since 1986, the Providence-based Everett Company has been devising multidisciplinary theater works that tour nationally. Several of their pieces have received critical acclaim in major publications such as the New York Times, who singled out Everett’s Home Movies as a performance highlight for 2004. Another piece, Body of Work, was awarded a Bessie, the New York Dance and Performance Award. Since 1990, Everett has run a school out of their Carriage House rehearsal and performance space that offers free dance and theatre classes to low-income youth. Many students who have grown up through the school have gone on to join Everett’s professional touring company. Everett’s performance work has been supported by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, Creative Capital’s MAP Fund, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Ford Foundation, SURDNA, The Doris Duke Foundation, The Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, the National Dance Project, RISCA, and The Rhode Island Foundation, among others.

Partial funding for this event comes from Brown University Creative Arts Council and the Department of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies. SURDNA Foundation has provided generous support for FREEDOM PROJECT. Freedom Project is a National Performance Network (NPN) Creation Fund Project co-commissioned by Contemporary Dance Theater in partnership with The Yard, Brown University and NPN. For more information: www.npnweb.org.

RI monthly 2015 FP Dance photo

CLICK HERE TO READ “CINDERBLOCK STORIES”, AN ARTICLE BY CASEY NILSSON IN RI MONTHLY MAGAZINE.

“Christopher Johnson is telling a story and he’s saying it straight. Devoid of flourishes yet not without elegance, the acclaimed spoken word artist blankets an audience with the plain truth of his past growing up in Newark, New Jersey.”

Copyright permission granted, Rhode Island Monthly Communications Inc 2015


Everett Announces New Work – Freedom Project

Everett has started the second year of a three-year research and creation process for the development of our new touring piece. Freedom Project will be a multi-disciplinary documentary theater production that shares the stories of people who have been marginalized by America’s criminal justice system. The project examines and critiques that system through the juxtapositions of personal stories with jarring statistics that reveal gross racial and socio-economic disparities in the way the law is applied, especially in regard to the War on Drugs.

Read More

Freedom Café Videos:

Freedom Café - Hip-Hop Saved My Life

Freedom Café - A Boy Named Nothing

Freedom Café - Dear Mr. President

Everett’s Open Stage: P.U.S.H. and Tru Love

RI Monthly: Little Company, Huge Ideas

Everett: Company, Stage and School in Providence forgoes dusty playbills filled with decades-old ideas for progressive, thought-provoking material that can’t be seen anywhere else. The company, cofounded in 1986 by Dorothy, Aaron and Rachael Jungels, is known for producing powerful pieces of hybrid dance/theater backed by thorough academic and community research. Members are currently in the midst of a two-year research and development endeavor, called the Freedom Project, in collaboration with Brown University. Read More

Freedom Café

The Freedom Café examined issues related to incarceration, such as the disproportionate number of prisoners of color in the prison system, and the prison system’s default role as society’s solution to addiction and other mental health issues. The evening included poetry and personal stories from a Providence native who grew up in the prison system. Read More