Freedom Project: Freedom Café – A Boy Named Nothing
May 19, 2014
Open Stage
May 29, 2014

Freedom Project: Freedom Café – Hip Hop Saved My Life

Hip Hop Saved My Life: Freedom Project Brain Café

Thursday, April 17 @ 7:30pm — Free

Everett Stage: 9 Duncan Avenue, Providence, RI 02906

This Brain Café will examine the role of hip hop in the fight for social justice featuring Tricia Rose and Case Closed!

Tricia Rose, professor at Brown University and author of Black Noise and The Hip Hop Wars, will argue that hip hop artists, and the commercialization of black popular culture more generally, have more power than ever to shape racial and gender images, perceptions and policies. Case Closed!, Everett’s resident hip hop company, will present dances and stories that share the ways hip hop has impacted their lives. These pieces will touch upon issues of incarceration, portrayals of women, and poverty.

Hannah “B-Mor7” Resseger is a Hip Hop artist, activist, educator and youth worker from Rhode Island. She will be opening up the evening with a spoken word piece. Jeny “Luna” Hernandez, an Everett alumni and professional photographer, began by documenting various fashion, cultural, community empowerment, and hip hop events throughout New England and New York. Jeny will have photos on display from her years photographing the b-boy movement in Rhode Island and throughout New England. Tyrone “P.U.S.H” Akion, a former student of Everett: Company, Stage and School and Carriage House Krew member, is a spoken word artist, songwriter and bboy. He will perform an original spoken word piece to end the evening.

This event is part of the creation of Freedom Project and partial funding comes from Brown University Creative Arts Council and Department of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies.

This Brain Café is made possible through major funding support from the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities, an independent state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

This Brain Café is made possible through major funding support from the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities, an independent state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

This event is part of the creation of Freedom Project and partial funding comes from Brown University Creative Arts Council and Department of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies.

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