What do Science and Art have to offer each other?

The panel will bring together artists and scientists who are interested in what art and science have to offer each other. They will share stories from their work at the intersection of art and science and talk about the joys and pitfalls of trying to bridge the gap between them. Participants will include: Lucy Spelman a biologist, veterinarian, educator, public speaker, media consultant, and author who co-teaches a course at RISD on the art of communicating science; Aaron and Dorothy Jungels, artistic directors of Everett, who will share their experiences collaborating with scientists in their work; Michael Paradiso director of Brown’s Center for Vision Research and professor of neuroscience; and Sarah Pease a RISD student who co-founded the STEAM Club at RISD, whose goal is to add Art to the national Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) initiative.

Panelists:

Lucy H. Spelman

is a veterinarian, educator, author, and media consultant.  She grew up with a menagerie of animals on an old dairy farm in rural Connecticut.While in middle school, she looked forward to “old clothes Wednesday,” a day set aside by one of her teachers to explore the nature trails across the street. She earned a bachelor of arts in biology fromBrown University, then her veterinary degree from the University of California at Davis, and completed her post-doctoral training at North Carolina State University. Board-certified by the American College of Zoological Medicine in 1994, Dr. Spelman’s work experience includes nearly ten years with theSmithsonian’s National Zoo, half as a clinical veterinarian, and half as its director. She joined theMountain Gorilla Veterinary Project in October 2006 as its Africa-based regional manager. During the 2009-2010 academic year, Lucy was a visiting Assitant Professor at Brown University where she initially earned a B.A. in biology (1985.)  She taught for Dr. Ruth Colwill, a Professor in the Pscychology Department, who is a specialist on animal behavior and was on sabbatical.  Lucy taught a senior seminar on primate behavior the fall, and a first-year seminar on animal health in the spring.  This fall (2010), she will teach a course at the Rhode Island School of Design as part-time faculty. Her course is titled: Human-Anima Interactions: How One Species Impacts Another.

Aaron Jungels, Artistic Director/Performer

Aaron is co-founder and co-artistic director of Everett, and brings a variety of skills in performance, design, and media creation to his work with the Company. Aaron graduated from Rhode Island School of Design with a degree in film and video, and studied acting at Trinity Rep Conservatory. In addition to designing and constructing many of the innovative props, set pieces, and non-traditional projection surfaces used by Everett, Aaron renovated a carriage house that is home to the Company’s studio theater and School. For his work outside of Everett, Aaron has received fellowships and grants from the Creative Capital MAP Fund and from the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts.

Dorothy Jungels, Director/Artistic Director

Dorothy co-founded Everett Dance Theatre (Everett) in 1986, after receiving a Choreographer’s Fellowship from the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts. Dorothy is the recipient of two choreography fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, a Rhode Island Foundation Fellowship, and six fellowships from Rhode Island State Council on the Arts. Under Dorothy’s direction, Everett has been recognized with a Bessie, a New York Dance and Performance award, a Pell Award for excellence in the arts, and the RI Alliance in Education Award for combining science and art.

 Sarah Pease, RISD Student/Co-Founder of STEAM Club

Aims to engage students with the rising push to include art + design thinking into the traditional “STEM” model; encourages students to investigate the principles of STEAM in their own work by exposing students to local and online resources, hosting events, and building networks.

MICHAEL PARADISO, Ph.D., Director of Brown’s Center for Vision Research

The aims of Dr. Paradiso’s research are to elucidate the encoding of visual information in cerebral cortex, the computations performed by interacting neurons, and the adaptive use of neural circuitry, with the goal of understanding the mechanisms underlying human visual perception.


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